Otherwhere Collective
ritmo

OC Format Stencil

A variable font with three axes that allow it to transition seamlessly from functional sans serif stencil to a more playful, expressive and musical design. Built on OC Format Sans Bd it is designed for logos and body copy alike.

Stencil
Opentype
Out to Lunch!
RRrrooaarr! RRrrooaarr!
Opentype
As usual with Davis' recording sessions during this period, tracks were recorded in sections. Davis gave a few instructions: a tempo count, a few chords or a hint of melody, and suggestions as to mood or tone. Davis liked to work this way; he thought it forced musicians to pay close attention to one another, to their own performances, or to Davis's cues, which could change from moment to moment. On the quieter passages of "Bitches Brew", for example, Davis's voice is audible giving instructions to the musicians, snapping his fingers to indicate tempo, telling the musicians to "Keep it tight" in his distinctive voice, or instructing individuals when to solo — e.g., saying "John" during the title track."John McLaughlin" and "Sanctuary" were also recorded during the August 19 session. Towards the end the group rehearsed "Pharaoh's Dance". Despite his reputation as a "cool," melodic improviser, much of Davis' playing on this album is aggressive and explosive, often playing fast runs and venturing into the upper register of the trumpet. His closing solo on "Miles Runs the Voodoo Down" is particularly noteworthy in this regard. Davis did not perform on the short piece "John McLaughlin".
Opentype
As usual with Davis' recording sessions during this period, tracks were recorded in sections. Davis gave a few instructions: a tempo count, a few chords or a hint of melody, and suggestions as to mood or tone. Davis liked to work this way; he thought it forced musicians to pay close attention to one another, to their own performances, or to Davis's cues, which could change from moment to moment. On the quieter passages of "Bitches Brew", for example, Davis's voice is audible giving instructions to the musicians, snapping his fingers to indicate tempo, telling the musicians to "Keep it tight" in his distinctive voice, or instructing individuals when to solo — e.g., saying "John" during the title track."John McLaughlin" and "Sanctuary" were also recorded during the August 19 session. Towards the end the group rehearsed "Pharaoh's Dance". Despite his reputation as a "cool," melodic improviser, much of Davis' playing on this album is aggressive and explosive, often playing fast runs and venturing into the upper register of the trumpet. His closing solo on "Miles Runs the Voodoo Down" is particularly noteworthy in this regard. Davis did not perform on the short piece "John McLaughlin".
JAZZ TIME poster mockups using variable stencil font OC Format Stencil
OPUS

MAHLER

Nº3

Features

"Rrrrooaarr" written in variable font OC Format Stencil
Offset
Split
Jumble

Figure Styles

Lining / Old Style / Tabular / Circled

Features

Stylistic Alternates / Arrows / Symbols / Standard Ligatures / Discretionary Ligatures / Double Character Ligatures

Languages

Western Europe / Central Europe / Eastern Europe / Baltic

Reference

Max Huber

Max Huber (1919–1992) was an influential Swiss graphic designer who met with both Werner Bischof and Josef Müller-Brockmann in his formative years. His career began in the orbit of Max Bill  before he relocated to Milan to work at the Studio Boggeri. A keen jazz fan he is known for a series of stunning records covers and music magazines as well as corporate work for clients such as Olivetti and 3M. His dynamic approach to type and bold use of colour ensured that the values of the Central European Modernism of the inter-war years were still current at the end of his life in 1992.

Paul Rand

Paul Rand (1914–1996) was an American art director and graphic designer, best known for his corporate logo designs, including the logos for IBM, UPS, ABC, and NeXT. He was one of the first American commercial artists to embrace and practice the Swiss Style of graphic design.

Bruno Munari

Bruno Munari (1907–1998 in Milan) was an Italian artist, designer, and inventor who contributed fundamentals to many fields of visual arts.